23
Feb
2009
25% of global food production may be lost in 2050
Curiosity

25% of global food production may be lost in 2050 due to climate change, degradation of the territory and to reduce the amount of water, said the United Nations.

UNEP (United Nations Program Ambient) - "We need to face not only the way the world produces food but also how it distributed, sold and consumed '- Achim Steiner.

It also said that half the food produced worldwide is lost, destroyed or thrown because ineficentei.

PNUA says that for more than one third of the world, cereals have been used for feeding, and this percentage may jump by half in 2050. Offer recycled food feeding as alternative environment.

In China, farmers have reduced synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and agricultural practices have changed.

 

Synthetic nitrogen is used in other countries are under pressure from food and high population growth.

Researchers say it may be replaced with synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and scrap recycling of legume crops and rotating crops.

Source www.abc.net.au

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