10
Feb
2009
Aglaia odorata
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida
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Scientific name - Aglaia odorata Lour.

Synonyms - Aglaia chaudocensis Pierre, Aglaia oblanceolata Craib.

Popular names - mi zan lau, mi sui lan, Chinese Perfume Tree, pancal kidan, ju-ran, muran.

Distribution and Habitat - native of Indochina.

Description - shrub or small tree, evergreen, 2 to 4 m high. Imparipenat-compound leaves, 10-17 cm long, leaflets 3-5, of 2.7 x 1-3 cm, opposite, glabrous, obovata-elliptic, base cuneata, top acute, shiny, ribbed wing. Fragrant flowers, unisexuate or polygamous, 2 mm in diameter, in axillary panicle inflorescences. Calyx with 4 sepals round. Nested petals, yellow, oblong-suborbiculare, leading to truncated round. Blooms in January-August. Fruit indehiscent, ovoid-subglobos, 1 cm diameter, red. Seeds with aril.

Growth rate - slowly.

Tolerant - intolerantthe temperature to 1 ° C, frequent mowing.

Requirements - increase in exhibitions with diffused light, or full sun, in conditions of low humidity. Prefers rich, deep fields.

Management - If grown in containers should be watered regularly, but the ground should dry between watering.

Propagation - by seeds and seedlings. Semi lignificati seedlings, using portions of the top Lujerul, spring and summer.

Diseases and pests - young plants can be attacked by aphids.

Partners garden

Cultivars -

Properties and Uses - Aglaia odorata extract has positive effects against the larvae of insects, and against B. thuringinensis. From flowers to extract an essential vinegar.

An extract from the leaves of A. odorata has proven to be inhibotor in developing larvae Peridroma saucca.

On averagetraditional meal is used as an antidepressant.

Curiosity

References

Anand Prakash Rao Jagadiswari - Botanical Pesticides in Agriculture - CRC, 1997

Arthur van Langerberg - Urban Gardening - The Chinese University Press, 2006

BT Styles, F. White - Flora of Tropical East Africa - CRC, 1991

Hu Shiu-Ying - Food Plants of China - The Chinese University Press, 2006

Johannes Seidemann - World Spice Plants - Springer, 2005

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