12
Jan
2011
Anthurium amnicola
Flowers | Liliopsida
5
0

Scientific Name - Anthurium amnicola

Synonyms -

Popular names -

Distribution and Habitat - Panama native (endemic), grows in tropical forests from 600 to 900 m altitude.

Description - herbaceous perennial, epiphytic. Leaves erect, petiolate, petiole 6-11 cm long, limb subcoriaceu, elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate, top graded acuminata, base acute or obtuse, 7 - 14.5 x 1.2 - 3.5 cm. Inflorescence erect, 6-26 cm long, shoulder subcoriacee, pale purple, ovate, 2.6 - 4 x 1.5-2 cm, abruptly acuminata at the top, round up to the attenuated base; spadix purple, violet, 0.8-2 cm long, flowers 2 x 3 mm. Fruit Baca, global, 4 mm in diameter, mezocarp jelly. Seeds 1-2, green, ovoid, 2.5 mm.

Tolerances - minimum night-time temperatures should be below 15 ° C and maximum daytime temperature does not exceed the 35 &g C.

Requirements - soil rich in organic matter mixed with perlite (for good drainage), exhibitions sunny but not direct sun.

Management - dried leaves can be removed because the diseases and pests. They fertilize with N: P: K ratio of 20:20:20.

Propagation - are planted at 30 cm x 30 cm distance between plants. It produces flowers after 8 months of planting.

Pests and diseases - Fusarium sp. Gloeosporoides Colletotrichum, Xanthomonas campestris


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Gentiana lutea

Gentiana lutea - mountain species, native to southern Europe, grows on limestone bedrock, on pastures rich in organic matter, from 1000 to 2200 m altitude.

 
Nepenthes L.

Herbaceous perennial species, dioecious. 5 cm diameter stalk. Leaves green to green-yellow with the main rib, which ends with a cylindrical Carcel which is longer than the tongue of the leaf, finished with a pitcher. Blossom panic or Raceme. Digestive glands are located inside the jar walls. Seeds are small and filiforme.

 
Delphinium ajacis

Ajacis delphinium - annual species, native to southern Europe, cultivated in different forms as ornamental horticulture.

 
Ranunculus asiaticus

Perennial herbaceous, stem 7-40 cm high. Caulinare different from the basal leaves, the basal are lobate, and those are areas caulinare. Flower 3-5 cm diameter, white, yellow or red; 3.5 sepa obsolete; 5 or more petals, stamens numerous. Fruit achenes, top acuminata recurbat, 4,5-5,6 x 3,0-3,7 mm, brown doll. 2n = 16.

 
Liliopsida
Dracaena marginata Lemarck

Popular names: English - Red-edged Dracaena, Madagascar Dragon-Tree, Hawaii - money tree.

Dracaena marginata Lemarck is an evergreen species native to Madagascar, was imported into Europe in the XVII century. Bush by 6 m high, formed more vertical stems. Leaves arranged spiral, simple, Sesia, entire, linear, evergreen, green with reddish margins, 15-45 x 0,7-3 cm; nervatiuni parallel.

 
Tulipa

Tulipa acuminata Vahl - The name of this species was introduced in 1813, when Martin Vahl, a professor of botany, including the list of plants grown in the Botanical Garden of Copenhagen.

Tulipa acuminata can grow to 40-50 cm high, leaves lanceolata, glauca. Flower solitary; tepale linear-lanceolata, acuminata; tepala is greater than 13 cm long.

 
Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora

Crocosmia, comes from the Greek 'Krok' = Crocus, and 'osme' = odor, "smell of Crocus'. Crocosmia was described in 1851 by Jules Emile Planchon.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora was created in France in 1880.

 
Cocos nucifera

Palm mono, with one strain. Trunk erect, gray, 20 m high and 50 cm in diameter. Paripenat-leaves are compound, folio 200-250 pairs of linear-lanceolata. 4,5-5,5 m long Frondele and stalks are covered quarter length. Foliolele have 1,5-5 cm wide. Ribbed rachides may be green or bronze.

 
Encyclia Hanbury (Lindley) Schlechter, 1914.

Herbaceous perennial, evergreen. Pseudobulb 8 x 4 cm. 1.2 leaves, elliptic-lanceolata, or elliptic-oblong, obtuse, 23 x 3 cm. Raceme blossom or panic, 100 cm long, 15-35 flowers, flower 5 cm diameter.

 
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