19
Jun
2009
Aquilegia atrata Koch
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific name - Aquilegia atrata Koch

Synonyms - Aquilegia vulgaris var. atroviolacea, Aquilegia vulgaris subsp. atrata

Popular names - boilers, dark Columbine, Aquilegia Scura.

Distribution and Habitat - spontaneous species in mountain forests in Austria, Switzerland, France, Germany, Italy and Slovenia, which grows in the semiumbra, from 400 to 2000 m altitude.

Description - herbaceous perennial. Rhizome thick, vertically or diagonally. Stem erect, branched, pubescent, green or red-purple shades, 30-80 cm high. Leaf sectors lobate 3 lobes or parts, green on the upper face and green on the lower glauca, basal leaves are long-petiolate, petiole 10-20 cm; caulinare leaves are smaller. Flowers actinomorfe, symmetric radiata, Pendente, hermaphrodite, perfumingI, long-pedunculate, ready to blossom panic; 5 tepale outer petaloide, spatulate or oval-lanceolata dark violet; 5 tepale interior nectarifere, dark purple, which ends with one spur to recurbat shaft, yellow stamens, May longer than the petals. Blooms in May-July. Fruit follicles. Seeds small, 1-1.5 mm long, black, shiny.

Protected species.

Propagation - by seeds, it looks like spring or fall. In the first year will be only a rosette of leaves, flowering the second year.

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