25
Nov
2010
Centaurea uniflora subsp. nervosa
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name - Centaurea uniflora Turra subsp. Bonnier & Layens nervosa

Synonyms - Centaurea nervosa, Jace plumosa, plumosa Centaurea.

Popular names -

Distribution and Habitat - originally from Northern Apennines, the Alps, south-eastern Carpathians and the Balkans. Hemicriptofita species, grows on dry meadows and rocky, limestone, from 1100 up to 2600 m altitude. Increases in association with Anthoxanthum odoratum, Aquilegia vulgaris subsp. vulgaris, Lotus corniculatus, Phyteuma orbicular, Senecio doronicum subsp. doronicum, Trollius europaeus subsp. Europaeus. Veratrum album.

Description - hermaphroditic species, pollinating. Tulpina 10-20 cm tall, erect, with a single capitulum. Green leaves, puberulente, sinuous toothed, lower ones are onlong-ovate, base truncata, semi-aplexicaule, are ovate leaves from the stem tip. Involucre 18-25 mm in diameter, ovoid-cilindric; Appendix bracteellor ovate inner, nested, Appendix middle bracts are brown and black, lanceolate-setacee, fimbriata, RECURVE the top, 20-30 on each side. Purple or white flowers. Blooms in July and August. Fruit achenes, 3-4 mm; Papus 1.5-1 mm. 2n = 22. Epizoohora pollination.


Properties and Uses -

Curiosity -

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