10
Mar
2010
Cerastium tomentosum - snow in summer
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name – Cerastium tomentosum L. 1753

Synonim – Cerastium columnae ten., Cerastium samnianum

Common name(s) – snow in summer.

Distribution and Habitat – native in the Caucasus and S-E Europe.

Description – perennial, rhizomatous. Flowering stem ascending, branched, 15-40 cm; nonflowering stems prostrate, pubescence dense, white-tomentose. Leaves sessile; blade linear to linear-lanceolate, 10-60 x 2-8 mm, apex obtuse, pubescence dense, whitish-tomentose, eglandular on both surfaces. Inflorescences lax, 3-13 flowered; bracts lanceolate, margins scarious, pubescent. Pedicels ascending, 10-40 mm, white tomentose. Flowers 12-20 mm diameter; sepals narrowly lanceolate-elliptic, 5-7 mm, apex acute, white-tomentose; petals obtriangular, 10-18 mm, apex bifid; 10 stamens. Flowering April-July. Cylindrical capsule, slightly curved, 10-15 mm. Seeds brown, cuneate to ellipsoidal or circular, 15 mm, rugose. 2n = 72

Growth rate – moderate to fast.

Tolerances –  tolerant of drought.

Requirements – well-drained sandy or loamy soils with low fertility; prefer full sun.

Management

Propagation – by division or by seeds sown in early spring. Germination usually takes 2-3 weeks at 21 ̊C. When seedlings are large enough to handle transplant and grow on in cooler conditions.

Pest and Diseases

Garden Partners – Allium schoenoprasum, Artemisia sp., Eryngium amethystinum, Geranium sylvaticum, Malva moschata, Penstemon birsutus, Stachys byzantina, Veronica spicata.

Cultivars – ‘Yoyo’ – leaves silvery, flowers white.

Properties and Uses – a commonly grown rock-garden, often escape from cultivation.

Curiosity

Bibliography

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