04
Jul
2010
Digitalis purpurea
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name - Digitalis purpurea L.

Synonyms -

Popular names - floxglove, digital rossa

Distribution and Habitat - is commonly found in the Black Forest Mountains.

Description - biennial species. Fibrous root. Stem erect, 100-200 cm tall, pubescent. Rough basal leaves, 10-30 cm long, elliptic, tomentoase leaves are arranged caulinare spiral serrated edge. Purple flowers, clocks in long spikes, calyx pubescent, lobes 5, oblong oval. Blooms in May-July. Fruit capsule. Seeds 0.1-0.2 mm.

Tolerances - tolerates freezing temperatures, but they need some protection from winter cold and snow.

Requirements - like a moderately rich, sandy soil, good drainage, in full sun or partial shade.

Propagation - by seed, mix them with sand before broadcasting in the cold frame or nursery bed. Cover very lightly with soil and keep continuously moist. Sow seeds in the late spring or early summer. Germination occurs within 2 weeks after sowing. When seedlings are 5-10 cm tall, transplant them to the garden, 25 - 30 cm between plants.

Properties and Uses - is an ornamental species, the size and elegant in almost any soil type and situation.

Some say that Vincent van Gogh took digitalis for epilepsy.

Digitalis purpurea digitalina contains a powerful drug used for heart disease. London was introduced in the 1650s in the pharmacopoeias.

Curiosity - At 1785 W. Withering, a physician in Birmingham for 10 years has studied the beneficial activity of Digitalis purpurea on the heart.

In 1842, RP Debreyne indicated that cardiotonica species.

Photos
Top
See also
Top
Flowers
Legousia speculum-veneris - Venus looking-glass

French botanist Legousia is dedicated Legouz name of Garland, founder of the botanical gardens in Digione 1773;  speculum-veneris = mirror of Venus because of the corolla form.

Speculum-Veneris Legousia can become invasive of cereal fields.

 
Agrimonia eupatoria L. - caoda Cancer, high turita

Agrimonia eupatoria - a perennial herb with a short rhizome and erect, hairy, usually unbranched stem. The basal leaves are arranged in a rosette. Is a common plant throughout Europe, ii is rare in north Scotland.

 
Verbascum blattaria

Verbascum blattaria - Herbaceous biennial, glabra bottom of the stem and glandular hairs towards the top, grows spontaneously in the desert and the hot side of cultivated fields, rivers and channels, up to 800 m altitude.

 
Marrubium vulgare - Voronez

Perennial herbaceous plants, root fusiform. Right strain, wood and rigid, pubescent, 30-100 cm tall. Leaves petiolate, opposite, green-gray, pubescent on the underside, lamina ovata or suborbiculara, iregulat-edge gear, top round or obtuse, base subcordata, 2.5-5 cm long, 1-2 cm long stalks.

 
Tulipa

Tulipa acuminata Vahl - The name of this species was introduced in 1813, when Martin Vahl, a professor of botany, including the list of plants grown in the Botanical Garden of Copenhagen.

Tulipa acuminata can grow to 40-50 cm high, leaves lanceolata, glauca. Flower solitary; tepale linear-lanceolata, acuminata; tepala is greater than 13 cm long.

 
Magnoliopsida
Brachyscome multifida

Brachyscome multifida - herbaceous perennial, rizomatoasa, native to temperate regions of southern Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

 
Rhaponticum scariosum

Rhaponticum scariosum - Alpine endemic species, grows on mountain pastures from 750 to 2500 m altitude.

 
Thunbergia alata - black-eyed Susan

Thunberg spelled - a species native to tropical Africa, but common as ornamental plants.

 
Schinus molle

Schinus molle - evergreen tree, 3-15 m tall. Originally from Argentina, Bolivia and Peru where it grows from 0 to 2400 m altitude. Cultivated soil erosion, but also as ornamental species, or bonsai.

 
Cornus sanguinea

Cornus sanguinea grows throughout Europe, rarer in the north, in the thicket, forest edges and edges of streets, from plain to 1000 m altitude.

 
   Add to iGoogle
Last posts

Categories

Links