30
Oct
2008
Four new species of Maranta L. Marantaceae in Brazil
New Species | Liliopsida

Family Marantaceae species are distributed, the majority of 80% in tropical regions, 11% in Asia and 9% in Africa (Hammel, 1986). The family includes about 530 species and 31 genera, are the most widespread genus Calathea.

Maranta is a tropical species that is found in Central and South America, but with most species concentrated in the Brazilian Atlantic forest and Amazonia.

Maranta coriacea - branched stem of 40-50 cm, rhizome. Glabra leaves, 10-12 cm long. White flowers about 2 cm long, sepa narrow-elliptic to linear, Corola with elliptical lobes, the apex acute.

Distributed in the state of Mato Grosso, Goias and Tocantins, where he was discovered in humid environments, near waterfalls.

Maranta longiflora - strain of 45-80 cm. Yellow flowers 3-4,5 cm long, SEPA glabra lanceolata, acuminata the top.

Maranta pulchra - stem branched from 70-100 cm tall. Leaves 6-8 cm long, petiole 2-3 mm long and lack the basal leaves. Inflorescences with white flowers 1-1,2 cm long, SEPA obovata, acute tip.

Maranta purpurea - species of 50-60 cm height. Leaves 11-15 cm long, petiole 14-22 cm long, elliptic to obovate.Flori 3-3.5 cm long, white Corola SEPA lanceolata to linear.

Source www3.interscience.wiley.com

See also
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Liliopsida
Calathea

Petiole long, brown at the base. Language leaves to ovat ovat-elliptic, top short acuminata, the round or obtuse, dark green on top with green central rib, except nervurii glabra. Blossom terminal, spike side flat, narrow oblong, 15-40 cm long, peduncle 25 cm long, 4,5-6 cm wide, green-yellow bractei

 
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Popular names - English: Areca, Areca-nut, betel nut palm, French: cachou falling within subheading, Arequier, German: Betelnusspalme, Guam: pugua, India: Pan, Spanish: catechou hand, Yap: bu.

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