05
Mar
2009
Galanthus nivalis L.
Flowers | Liliopsida

Scientific name-Galanthus nivalis L.

Synonyms - Galanthus angustifolius Koss.

Popular names - snowdrop, snow drop, Bucaneve, fior di neve.

Distribution and Habitat - native to the Mediterranean to the Caucasus. Grow on fertile land in forest species decidue.

Description - bulbous perennial species with herbaceous matter, erect, bulb ovoid, dark brown tunic, 1.5 x 2.4 cm. Leaves basal, 20 cm long, linear-lanceolata, rounded at the top. Flowers generally solitary, clocks, accompanied by a shoulder 3-4 cm long, 3 tepale flower is composed of external and internal 3 tepale erection of about 1cm, biloba, white with green spots, 6 stamens in the periantului; February-March period of prosperity. Fruit ellipsoidal or spherical capsule, three-loculara, 1.4 x 1,4 cm. Seeds brown-opened. The fruits are fully mature in June. Dissemination is done with ants.

Galanthus nivalis subsp. cilicicus - leaves of 16-18 cm, flowers from November to March.

Galanthus nivalis subsp. nivalis - leaves 9-16 cm, blooming from February to March;

Requirements - moist soils in sunny to partially shady expotizi.

Management - Every three years the bulbs should be removed in June or July, when the leaves change color and stored in dry place until August, when they replanted.

Propagation - by separation bulbililor. Bulbs are planted at 5.7 cm depth and distance of 5-7 cm join the others fall.

Natural partners and Garden - Helleborus, Cyclamen, Corydalis solid, Magnolia, Phlox, Omphalodes and Epimedium.

Properties and Uses - bulbs, leaves and flowers are poisonous. Reaching bulbs may cause skin irritation.

Myth, Legend and Forlclor - legend says that Adam and Eve, in their first days on earth, in the very cold winter, the thought Eva was sad to live in those conditions. An angel sent by God blowing snowflakes on it giving them the command to turn on shoots of hope, they reached the ground, were transformed into snowdrops, and Eve was very happy. From that day said that is enough to raise snowdrops in next month's first night in January to be happy all year.

Another legend says that one day in February was thirsty Jesus, Mary, his mother, went to a well but found an ice cream and said: 'How do I give water to my child?'. Earth heard these words, had 'to rise in snow a white flower of the mother give baby Jesus go to drink water.

References

Barbara Damrosch - The Garden Primer - Roda Press, 2003

Beth Hanson - Spring-Blooming Bulbs - BrookLyn Botanical Garden, 2002

Graham Rose - The Low Maintenance Garden - Frances Lincoln, 1983

John E. Bryan - Pocket Guide to Bulbs - Timber Press, 2005

Karan Junker - Gardening with Woodland Plants - Timber Press, 2007

Michael Hickey - 100 Families of Flowering Plants - Cambridge University Press, 1991

Rosemary Verey - The Garden in Winter - Frances Lincoln, 2006

The European Garden Flora Editorial Committee - European Garden Flora - Cambridge University Press, 1986

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