08
Dec
2008
Global warming, a false theory
Curiosity

'Global warming, a false theory' - and journalist says botanist David Bellamy.

In the last 10 years has increased the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere of 5%, this phenomenon has no influence on global average temperatures.

CO 2 is the most important natural fertilizer that participate in the process of photosynthesis. No carbon dioxide leads to desertification of the planet, but massive and uncontrolled deforestation. Global economy losing more money than exploiting forest spends with reforestation.

To manufacture biodiesel, it consumes a lot of energy, and nejustificandu-called renewable energy.

Wind turbines do not provide a stable source of energy. Each wind turbine annually kill 30 birds and many bats, and noise pollution produced by the wind park, along with radio disturbance and air transport are enough reasons to fight this formthe failure of renewable energy.

David Bellamy

Source www.adevarul.ro

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