27
Sep
2010
Gossypium herbaceum - Cotton
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name - Gossypium herbaceum L.

Synonyms - Gossypium obtusifolium Roxb.

Popular names - bumbac, kutum, cotton, levant cotton, Baumwolle, algodon.

Distribution and Habitat - a species indigenous to India, but grows in Egypt, Asia Minor, Arabia and China.

Description - shrub, 1-1.5 m high. Roots spindle. Green stem, pubescent, rarely glabra. Leaves long petiolate, palmate-lobed, 3-5 lobes, ovata or oblong, margins entire, the heart, top acute, pubescent, light green. Yellow flowers, calyx Campanula, surrounded by an involucre with 6-8 lobes, persistent, yellow petals with a purple patch at the base. Fruit capsule lodges 3-5, 3-5 seeds enveloped in cotton. 2n = 26

Requirements - by herbaceus seedlings and seeds. The seeds germinate at 25 C.

Pests and diseases - Alternaria macrospores, A. alternata, Aphis gossypii, Helicoverpa armigera, Scirtothrips dorsalis.

Properties and Uses - Cotton fiber is the most popular material obtained from this plant and the second is cotton oil rich in protein.

Curiosity - the first writings on cotton were found in the Rig-Veda, Hindu, and written around the 15th century BC

Cotton, derived from the Arabic word or kutum qutum.

Gossypium herbaceum derived from wild species G. herbaceum var. africanum that grows naturally in southern Africa.

Photos
Top
See also
Top
Flowers
Centaurea uniflora subsp. nervosa

Centaurea uniflora subsp. nervosa - originally from Northern Apennines, the Alps, south-eastern Carpathians and the Balkans. Hemicriptofita species, grows on dry meadows and rocky, limestone, from 1100 up to 2600 m altitude.

 
Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora

Crocosmia, comes from the Greek 'Krok' = Crocus, and 'osme' = odor, "smell of Crocus'. Crocosmia was described in 1851 by Jules Emile Planchon.

Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora was created in France in 1880.

 
Gentiana verna L.

Gentiana verna - a species native to southern central Europe, Russia, England and Ireland, increasing the Alpine and subalpine meadows, wetlands, from 400 to 2600 m altitude.

 
Felicia amelloides

Genus Felicia was named the Cassini AHG in 1818 by Felix, a German official at Regensburg who died in 1846.

Felicia amelloides first cinerary amelloides was named by Linnaeus in 1763 and in 1894 named Felicia amelloides.

 
Acta spicata

Acta spicata - a species native to Europe and Asia, grows in mountain forests in beech forests from 400 to 1500 m altitude.

 
Magnoliopsida
Tilia tomentosa - silver linden

Tree with dense crown, rich, 30 m high, with branches erect, rounded. Lujerii annual geniculati, brown-yellow, gray tomentosi with buds ovoid, with two external scales equal, also felt. At first bark is smooth and gray, mature form shallow longitudinal furrows.

 
Campsis radicans

Genus was created by Portuguese botanist João de Loureiro (1717-1791) in the 1790 Flora Cochinchinensis for Campsis grandiflora. Linne named species with TECOM radicans and Thunberg gave the name of Bignonia radicans.

 
Nepeta cataria

Nepeta cataria has similar properties with valeriana, amaro-tonic and sedative antispasmotica.

Nepeta cataria var. citronelol citriodora contains more essential oil used as perfume industry.

 
Davidia involucrata var. involucrata

Arbore pana la 20 m inaltime; coroana la inceput conica apoi devine neregulata, ramuri orizontale. Scoarta gri-maronie. Mugurele terminal are forma ovoida, 6-7 mm lungime, acuminat, rosu-brun inchis. Mugurii laterali 6-8 mm lungime.

 
Dombeya tiliacea (Endl.) Planch.

Shrub or small tree, 3.10 x 2.7 m, trunk branched, bark dark gray, rough. Leaves alternate, 4.9 x 3-7 cm, three-lobed basis cordata, margine teeth face bottom covered with fine hairs, stalks pelos, 1-3 cm. Flowers campanulata, 3-4 cm diameter, axillary or terminal, solitary or grouped in a raceme, petals white, obovata.

 
   Add to iGoogle
Last posts

Categories

Links