19
Jan
2009
Jasminum nudiflorum Lindl.
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name - Jasminum nudiflorum Lindl.

Synonyms -

Popular names - China - Ying-ch 'an Hua; English - winter jasmine, Japanese - a bathroom.

Distribution and Habitat - originated in China.

Description - species decidua. Green stems, 60-90 cm high, 1-2 m in diameter, edges, form adventitious roots. Brownish-red buds, ovoizi. Decidue leaves, opposite, pinnate-compound, 3 leaflets oblong, Sesi. Flowers solitary, six petals, 1-2 cm in diameter. Flourishing period January-March, before leaf. Baca fruit, meat, black on ripening. Seeds oval to obovate, the narrow, 5.8 x4, 4 mm crinkled surface, brown.

Growth rate -

Tolerance - tolerance from moderate drought, urban pollution and frost. Shoots to withstand temperatures of - 21 ° C.

RequirementsI - to adapt to any type of soil if well drained and easy.

Management - is easy to maintain, easy to transplant. Grows best in sunny exhibitions, but adapt and semi-shade. Cutting should be performed regularly to keep the crown shape control, is performed immediately after spring flowering. Be renewed every 5-6 years crown, cut to 15 cm above the ground.

Propagation - by seeds sown deep in June, or by cuttings (cuttings from mature wood) in September, is inserted 2-3 cm in the sand, the cold greenhouse.

Pests and diseases -

Partners garden - Cotoneaster horizontalis, Forsythia viridissima, Salix discolor, Cornus alba Daphne mezereum, Chionodoxa.

Cultivars - 'Aureum', 'Nanum', 'Variegatum', 'Mystique'.

Properties and Uses -

Curiosity- Jasminum nudiflorum was discovered in China by Dr. Alexander von Bunge in 1830.

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