09
Apr
2009
Menzies ferruginea Smith
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida

Scientific name - Menzies ferruginea Smith

Genus Menzies was dedicated to Archibald Menzies (1754-1842).

Synonyms - Menzies glabella

Popular names - Menzies, Huckleberry false, false azalea, azalea mock, rusty Menzies, skunkbrush, rustyleaf.

Distribution and Habitat - common shrub in the forests of Tsuga canadensis in North America.

Description - shrub 1-2 m tall, thin stalk, reddish brown, slightly pubescent, terminal buds in bouquets, bark red-brown to gray-brown, thin, becomes scaly. Leaves alternate, decidue, nervatiune pinnate, obovata-elliptic, 3-6 cm long, dark green on upper and pale green inside, margins entire or soirees. Flowers 0.5 cm, yellow to orange-pink, bell SEPA cilia, 0.7-0.8 cm Corola lungime, cylindrical-urceolate. Blooms in May-July. Fruit capsule Wood, glabra, 0.5-0.8 cm long.

Menzies ferruginea var. ferruginea

Menzies ferruginea var. glabella

Tolerances - shade, and temperatures up to (-20 ˚ C).

Requirements - grows well in humid summers and colder soils rich in humus, acid in partially-shaded exhibitions.

Propagation - by seeds in containers at 13 ˚ C spring or autumn cold greenhouse, germination takes place after 1-2 months. Seedlings, seedlings with 2-5 Semi prof lignificati Cmin June-July.

Diseases and pests --

Natural partners and Garden - Alnus Rubus, Blechnum angel, Clinton uniflora, Coptis laciniata, Cornus canadensis, Gaultheria shallon, Holodiscus discolor, Linnaea borealis, Polypodium Glycyrrhiza, Selaginella oregana, Streptopus roseus, Streptopus amplexifolius, Thuja envelope, Tsuga heterophylla, Vaccinium alaskaense.

Properties and Uses - The leaves are analgesic properties for the heart and stomach pains.

References

Daniel E. Moerman - Native American ethnobotany - Timber Press, 1998

James S. Fralish, Scott B. Franklin - Taxonomy and Ecology of Woody Plants in North American Forest - Wiley, 2002

Leroy Abrams - Illustrated Flora of the Pacific States - Stanford University Press, 1951

Les Viereck - Alaska Trees and Shrubs - University of Alaska Press, 2007

Ralph W. Young - Wetland Indicators - CRC, 1999

See also
Top
Trees and shrubs
Melia azedarach L.

Name the genre, Melia, derived from Greek and 'azedarach', the Persian word and means 'noble trees'.

Popular name: English: bread tree, Persian lilac, China berry; Nepal: bakaino, Tibet: smag sing.

Distrubuire - in Nepal at around 700-1700 m altitude village in Iran Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Bhutan and China.

 
Lonicera xylosteum

Lonicera xylosteum - shrub originating from Europe, the Caucasus and Siberia, growing at the edge of deciduous forests, from lowland to 1600 m altitude. They prefer warm places and limestone associated with Cornus sanguinela, Ligustrum vulgare, Prunus padus and Rubus idaeus.

 
Carica papaya

Carica papaya - originally from Costa Rica, USA, tropical to temperate areas, up to 1500 m altitude.

The fruit contains protein, carbohydrates, potassium, phosphorus, vitamin A, vitamin C.

 
Arbutus unedo

Evergreen shrub originating in Southern Ireland and Mediterranean regions, grows slowly, up to 3 to 10 m, reddish bark, young branches are red-hot, dense crown. Leaves alternate, elliptic-lanceolata, 5-10 cm long, parties, except ribs smooth, glossy dark green, pinnate nervatiune. Flowers white to pale pink, sometimes stained with red, 5-10 mm long, campanulata, odorless, ready to panicule 5 cm long, anther clocks.

 
Acacia sieberiana

Acacia sieberiana - tree, 3-25 m tall, rounded crown. Increase in savannah, in semi-arid regions of Africa, from 0-1850 m altitude.

 
Magnoliopsida
Theobroma cacao

Theobroma cacao - the tree deciduu originating from semi-tropical forests of Brazil, Mexico and the U.S.A

The genus name derives from the Greek "theos" = god, and 'bromine' = food, food of the gods.

 
Teline nervosa

Teline nervosa - endemic of the Canary Islands, rape increases from 650 to 700 m altitude, in association with Aeonium undulatum, Carlina salicifolia, Crambe pritzelii, Hypericum canariensis, Olea europaea subsp. cerasiformis, Sonchus leptocephalus.

 
Pachira aquatica

Pachira aquatica growing naturally along rivers in Central and South America. Is cultivated in world wide like ornamental, in hedges or solitary. Resistant to drought anf flooding.

The seeds of P. aquatica are delicious raw, boiled or roasted. Young leaves and flowers are also edible. The seeds are high in protein and edible oil.

 
Aphelandra squarrosa

Bush or undergrowth, 30-60 cm. Leaves petiolate, oblong-elliptic, entire, 25-30 x 7-10 cm, spiny-toothed, crenate or sinuous lobate, grooved records and white ribs. Blossom terminal or axillary, pyramidal spike. Flowers Sesi, yellow bractei large to ovata lanceolata. Calyx 8-10 mm. Corola yellow, 3.8-5 cm, corolla tube 3-3.5 cm, upper petal is erect, about 8 mm, biloba, lower petal is tri-lobate

 
Stachys Byzantine

Stachys Byzantine - perennial species, native to southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia, grows on dry slopes at the edge of forests, up to 2000 m altitude.

 
   Add to iGoogle
Last posts

Categories

Links