25
May
2009
Nepenthes L.
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific name - Nepenthes L.

The first description of this kind was made by JP Breyne, in 1689.

Popular names --

Distribution and Habitat - grows in all tropical regions of the world, Madagascar, northern Seychelles, Sri Lanka and northern Australia, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Description - herbaceous perennial species, dioecious. 5 cm diameter stalk. Leaves green to green-yellow with the main rib, which ends with a cylindrical Carcel which is longer than the tongue of the leaf, finished with a pitcher. Blossom panic or Raceme. Digestive glands are located inside the jar walls. Seeds are small and filiforme.

Growth rate - moderate to fast.

Tolerances - not tolerate stagnant water.

 

Management - is fertilizeaza in 3-4 weeks. The soil should be kept moist but not saturated with water, water is the ideal rain or distilled water.

Propagation - by seeds, it looks at the soil surface applied fungicides both on land and the seeds. It maintains a high humidity and temperature of 21-29 ˚ C. Germination occurs in 6 weeks. Are ready for transplant when have 2-3 leaves and about 2.5 cm high.

The stem cuttings, seedlings must have 2.3 knots, is treated with fungicide. Cuttings to maintain the high humidity, in full light, the temparaturi of 21-29 ˚ C.

Diseases and pests - Botrytis, aphids, snails.

Cultivars and varieties - 'Accebtual Koto', 'compact', 'coccinea', 'Minamiensis','Siebertii'.

References

James Pietropaolo, Patricia Pietropaolo - Carnivorous Plants of yhe World - Timber Press, 1997

Peter D'Amato - The Savage Garden - Ten Speed Press, 1998

RL Kitching - Food Webs and Container habitats - Cambridge University Press, 2000

Wilhelm Barthlott, Stefan Porembski, Rüdiger Seine, Inge Theisen - The Curious World of Carnivorous Plants - Timber Press, 2008

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