20
Feb
2009
Pittosporum tobira
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida

Scientific name - Pittosporum tobira

Synonyms --

Popular names - English: tobira, mock orange, Australian Laurel, Japan: Tober, tobira.

Distribution and Habitat - originating in China and Japan.

Description - shrub 4 m high, dense crown. Bark brown, rough. Leaves persistent, coriacee, simple, language spatulate, entire edge, top round, the obovata, central rib obvious, and glossy dark green upper side, more open bottom, glabra, arranged in vertical false. Umbela blossom. Flowers hermaphrodite, scented (like orange flowers); Corola 5 free petals, 2.5 cm diameter. Fruit capsule flashy, triangular, subsferica, 1-2 cm diameter, green. Seeds covered by a mucilaginous layer red-orange.

Growth rate - fast.
Tolerances - Minimum tempratura supported -10 °C. It should be protected from winds from the north. Tolerate short periods of drought. Resist well to marine aerosols.
Requirements - souluri prefer well drained, humus rich, moist, in sunny or semi-shady exhibitions. Does not require any cutting, the crown is fairly uniform.
Management --

Propagation - by semi-lignificati seedlings.

Diseases and pests --
Partners garden - Ligustrum lucidum, Viburnum tinus, Photinia x Fraser.
Cultivars - 'variegatum' - 1.5 m high, leaves 10-15 cm long, obovata, green with white edges. 'Wheeler's Dwarf' - grows very slowly, very compact crown, dense. Grow on alkaline soils;
Properties and Uses - plant oras. Can be used for hedges.

Curiosity - Pittosporum tobira was introwent to England in 1804, in Canton, China, by William Kerr, botanical collector for Kew Garden.

References

James R. Cothran - Gardens and Historic Plants of the Antebellum - University of South Carolina Press, 2003

Marie Harrison - Groundcovers for the South - Pineapple Press, 2006

Ran Levy-Yamamori, Gerard Taaffe - Garden Plants of Japan - Timber Press, 2004

Ronald Houtman, Royal Boskoop Horticultural Society Staff - Variegated Trees and Shrubs - Timber Press, 2004

W. Arthur Whistler - Tropical Ornamentals - Timber Press, 2000

 

Photos
Top
See also
Top
Trees and shrubs
Prunus cerasifera - corcodus

Prunus cerasifera - is grown for its edible fruit jams are made and cultivars and varieties are found all over the world species grown as ornamentals in parks and gardens, or green street.

 
Abies concolor Lindl.

Silver tree - evergreen tree, used for ornamental purposes, because the pyramid shape of the crown, the colorii leaves and frost resistance. The name 'concolor' refers to the fact that leaves have the same color on both sides.

 
Erica canaliculata

Erica canaliculata - shrub originating from South Africa, used as an ornamental species in parks and gardens.

 
Carpinus betulus

Carpinus betulus - hard wood shaft with durable but less humid conditions. Suprta trimming and better suited for bonsai training.

 
Ceanothus thyrsiflorus

Shrub or small tree, evergreen, 1-4 m high. Prostrata strain or upward. Green stalk, glabra, thin, flexible, geniculati. Leaves 2-6 cm long, oblong-elliptic, top obtuse or acute, margin fine teeth 3 ribs prominent upper front glabra, 12-15 mm long stalks.

 
Magnoliopsida
Antennaria dioica

Antennaria dioica - perennial species, growing on acid soils, deciduous and coniferous forests, subalpine and alpine meadows, from 100-2300 (rare 3100).

 
Legousia speculum-veneris - Venus looking-glass

French botanist Legousia is dedicated Legouz name of Garland, founder of the botanical gardens in Digione 1773;  speculum-veneris = mirror of Venus because of the corolla form.

Speculum-Veneris Legousia can become invasive of cereal fields.

 
Pedicularis rostrata-capitata

  Pedicularis rostrata-capitata - grows on alpine and subalpine meadows, cave sites, 1800-2400 m altitude.

Pedicularis rostrata-capital belongs to the family Orobanchaceae, which contain parasites or semiparazite, with or without chlorophyll, leaf bracteiforme.

 
Cardamine bulbifera

Cardamine bulbifera - herbaceous species, perennial. Hailing from Europe and Asia Minor, grow on fertile soils, limestone, 200 to 1800 m altit., In association with Coryllus avellana, Carpinus betulus, Crataegus laevigata, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus robur, ursinum Allium, Carex pendula, Hyacinthoides non- scripta, Mercurialis perennis, Lamiastrum galeobdolon.

 
Saponaria officinalis

Saponaria officinalis - perennial species, rhizome cylindrical, highly branched, crawler, with sterile and fertile shoots. Originally from Europe and Asia, growing on the river, along fences, roads and crops edges.

 
   Add to iGoogle
Last posts

Categories

Links