29
May
2009
Pontederia cordata L.
Flowers | Liliopsida

Scientific name - Pontederia cordata L.

Genus name is given to commemorate Linne Guilio Pontedera Italian physicist (1688-1756), professor and director of the Botanic Garden at Padua in Padua in 1719-1757.

Synonyms --

Popular names - pickerelweed, Wampee.

Distribution and Habitat - originally from the temperate zones of North America.

Description - aquatic species perennial, 45-60 cm tall, thin rhizome. Leaves basal, erect, ovat-lanceolata, with the cord; long petiole. Flowers violet-blue, rarely white, with an upper lobe yellow blossom disposed in ear type. Perianth campanulata, Revol tube after blooming, 6 stamens, 3 more unequal, May 3 children; anther elliptic, blue. Blooms in June-September. The fruit contains a single seed, indehiscent.

Growth rate --

Tolerant - can be adjusted for shallow water or deeper.

Requirements - grow in full sun and semi-shade, on moist soil or water.

Management --

Propagation - dividing rhizomes, spring. The runners, summer. The seeds soon after ripening.

Diseases and pests - aphids.

Natural partners and Garden - Hibiscus moscheutos, Nymphaea cordata, Peltandra virginica, Phragmites australis, Pistia stratioites,  Sagittaria latifolia, Sagittaria lancifolia, Spartina cynosuroides, Typha latifolia.

Cultivars and varieties - P. cordata 'Alba' grows in full sun or semi-shade, on moist soil or in water 25 inches deep. 60-75 cm high. P. cordata 'angustifolia' blue flowers, dark green leaves. P. cordata 'Pink Pons' pink-purple flowers, grows in full sun or semi-shade in moist soil or in water 15 inches deep. P. cordata 'Singapore Pink' Pink flowers.

P. cordata var. cordata - strain up to 1 m tallme, leaves deltoid to triangular-ovata-lanceolata, the deep heart or truncata, 20 cm long, 15 cm long ear.

P. cordata var. lanceolata.

Properties and Uses - infusion of this plant was used as a contraceptive method.

Myth, Legend and Folklore --

References

Blanche E. Dean - Wild Flowers of Alabama and Adjoining States - The University of Alabama Press, 1983

Daniel E. Moerman - Native American ethnobotany - Timber Press, 1998

Donovan Stewart Correll - Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Southwestern United States - Stanford University Press, 1975

Greg Speichert, Sue Speichert - Encyclopedia of Water Garden Plants - Timber Press, 2004

Helen Nash, Steve Stroupe, Perry D. Slocum, Bob Romar - Complete Guide to Water Plants - Sterling, 2004

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