29
Nov
2010
Prunus armeniaca - apricot
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name - Prunus armeniaca L.

Synonyms - armeniaca vulgaris Lam.

Popular names - cais, apricot, albicocca, zardalu.

Distribution and Habitat - originally from northeastern China

Description - shrub or small tree, 3-6 (12) m tall; lujerii young and new leaves are reddish. leaves 5-10 x 5-8 cm, ovate to suborbiculare, acuminata leading to cusp edge soiree, the subcordata or truncata. subsesile flowers, solitary or in bunches, appear before the leaves, calyx pubescent, reddish-brown, petals 10-15 mm, white or pale pink. Drupa fruit, edible, 4-8 cm diameter, subglobos, velutat, orange to yellow, yellow-orange mezocarp; endocarp lenticular, smooth, with three ribs along an edge. 2n = 16

Growth rate -

Tolerances - tolerate soil salinity. Not long tolerate frosts.

Requirements - to get quality fruits prefer deep soils, fertile and well drained

Management -

Propagation - by seed or by grafting.

Diseases and pests - Xanthomonas campestris, Cytospora sp., Pseudomonas syringae.

Garden Partners -

Cultivars -

Properties and Uses - grown for edible fruit, apricot.

Curiosity - apricot Romans introduced in Europe in 70-60 BC through Greece and Italy.

Apricots contain Vitamin A, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin C, Calcium, Phosphorus, Iron, Sodium, Potassium.

The seeds of Prunus armeniaca extract oil used in perfume industry, cosmetics and pharmacy.

 

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