29
Nov
2010
Prunus armeniaca - apricot
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida
4
0

Scientific Name - Prunus armeniaca L.

Synonyms - armeniaca vulgaris Lam.

Popular names - cais, apricot, albicocca, zardalu.

Distribution and Habitat - originally from northeastern China

Description - shrub or small tree, 3-6 (12) m tall; lujerii young and new leaves are reddish. leaves 5-10 x 5-8 cm, ovate to suborbiculare, acuminata leading to cusp edge soiree, the subcordata or truncata. subsesile flowers, solitary or in bunches, appear before the leaves, calyx pubescent, reddish-brown, petals 10-15 mm, white or pale pink. Drupa fruit, edible, 4-8 cm diameter, subglobos, velutat, orange to yellow, yellow-orange mezocarp; endocarp lenticular, smooth, with three ribs along an edge. 2n = 16

Growth rate -

Tolerances - tolerate soil salinity. Not long tolerate frosts.

Requirements - to get quality fruits prefer deep soils, fertile and well drained

Management -

Propagation - by seed or by grafting.

Diseases and pests - Xanthomonas campestris, Cytospora sp., Pseudomonas syringae.

Garden Partners -

Cultivars -

Properties and Uses - grown for edible fruit, apricot.

Curiosity - apricot Romans introduced in Europe in 70-60 BC through Greece and Italy.

Apricots contain Vitamin A, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin C, Calcium, Phosphorus, Iron, Sodium, Potassium.

The seeds of Prunus armeniaca extract oil used in perfume industry, cosmetics and pharmacy.

 

Photos
Top
See also
Top
Trees and shrubs
Pachira aquatica

Pachira aquatica growing naturally along rivers in Central and South America. Is cultivated in world wide like ornamental, in hedges or solitary. Resistant to drought anf flooding.

The seeds of P. aquatica are delicious raw, boiled or roasted. Young leaves and flowers are also edible. The seeds are high in protein and edible oil.

 
Syringa vulgaris L.

Syringa vulgaris is a native of the mountainous regions of south-eastern Europe.

 
Thevetia peruviana - leandru yellow

Evergreen shrub, 6 m high. Stem erect, cylindrical, branched, smooth, green, presents latex. Leaves simple subsesile, alternate, arranged spiral limb linear, entire edge, top acute, glabra, 8-16 cm long.

 
Senna corymbosa

Evergreen shrub, 2-3 m high, stem thin, highly ramified, almost glabru. Leaves alternate, petiolate, membranous, paripenat compound, 2-3 pairs of folio; stipele linear, obsolete, or oblong-folio oblonga lanceolata, 5 x 1 cm, top acute or obtuse, base round and asymmetrical, the ventral green, glabra .

 
Camellia japonica

Evergreen ornamental plant of the Theaceae family, native from Eastern Asia, its origin is still controversial, being considered by some as species indigenous from Japonia and, by others, from China. It was introduced into Europe by the Portuguese in 1542 and soon spread to Spain, England, France and Italy; into United States at the beginning of the 18th century, and in Australia during the mid 19th century.

 
Magnoliopsida
Cosmos sulphureus

Cosmos sulphureus - used as an ornamental species for borders or groups, in association with Asclepias curassavica, Coreopsis tinctoria, Oenothera fruticosa, Rudbeckia hirta, Salvia farinacea, Solidago canadensis, Tagetes erecta.

 
Buxus sempervirens

Buxus sempervirens - evergreen shrub, native of northern Africa, Asia and Europe, up to 800 m altitude. Increases in rare deciduous forests on limestone substrates in sunny exhibition, in association with integerrimus Cotoneaster, Pyrus pyraster, Prunus spinosa and Amelanchier rotundifolia.

 
Cirsium palustre

Originally from Europe and western Asia, growing on wet soils and peat, from plain to 1800 m altitude.

 
Camellia japonica

Evergreen ornamental plant of the Theaceae family, native from Eastern Asia, its origin is still controversial, being considered by some as species indigenous from Japonia and, by others, from China. It was introduced into Europe by the Portuguese in 1542 and soon spread to Spain, England, France and Italy; into United States at the beginning of the 18th century, and in Australia during the mid 19th century.

 
Aglaia odorata

Aglaia odorata is a tree native to Southeast Asia and grown as an ornamental tree throughout the Pacific Rim. In the Philippines, a decoction of roots is used as a drink to reduce fever.

 
Comments
Top
comments powered by Disqus
   Add to iGoogle
Last posts

Categories

Links