28
Oct
2009
Saccharum officinarum - Sugar cane
Flowers | Liliopsida
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Scientific name - Saccharum officinarum L.

Synonyms --

Popular names - sugar cane, sugar cane, cane de Azucar, ampeu, sweet cup, Canna da zuccheri, Canne de Sucre, May mia, sakhara, teboe, TEBU, uuka, Zukerrohr.

Distribution and Habitat - originally from New Guinea is rich in sugar STEM in India, China, Africa, South America, Australia.

Description - herbaceous perennial strain neramificata, 3-4 m high, 3-5 cm diameter. Roots of two ways, first type is formed from Butas after planting, are thin and bends, the second type of primary shoots grow roots flashy and less branched, with all the old roots are brown and dry. Leaves linear-lanceolata, 1.5 m long, 10 cm wide at the base, margins slightly soirees;Main rib prominent, white, concave on the upper side and green on the underside. Flowers arranged in terminal panicule, 1 m long. Spicurile are arranged in pairs, one pedicel and the other sessile, with silky silvery hairs. Jokes equal cartacee. Ovata seeds, yellow-brown, 1 cm long. 2n = 80

Requirements - warm climate, fertile soil, abundant water.

Cultivars and varieties - 'Pele's Smoke' purple stems. 'Violaceum'.

Properties and Uses - The roots are diuretic properties. The stem is sweet, emollient, laxative, diuretic, aphrodisiac, expectorant and tonic.

Myth, Legend and Folklore --

Cortés encouraged the cultivation of sugarcane in 1530. before Cortés in Mexico and India have started producing honey, or syrup, distilled from the leaves or stems.

In 1600, Brazil was the largest growing trare sugar, then and Africa, India, Australia and Hawaii.

References

Ivan A. Cross - Medicinal Plants of the World - Humana Press, 2005

RHM Langer, GD Hill - Agricultural Plants - Cambridge University Press, 1991

William W. Dunmire, Evangeline L. Dunmire - Gardens of New Spain - University of Texas Press, 2004

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