10
May
2011
Salpichroa organifolia
Flowers | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name - Salpichroa organifolia Thell.

Synonyms - Salpichroa rhomboidea Miers

Popular names - salpicroa, uova di rondine, cock’s eggs, uvita del campo, huevo de gallo, muguet des Pampas.

Distribution and Habitat - native to South America, naturalized and naturalized French Atlantic coast, around the Mediterranean, Corsica and Spain, grows on wet substrates, from 0 to 600 m altitude.

Description - perennial, rhizomatic and subfrutescenta, 80 inches tall. Stems branched, prostrate or ascending, herbaceous, sparsely pubescent towards the top. Leaves entire, ovate, tip obtuse, the attenuated, arranged opposite or irregular. Actinomorfe Flowers hermaphrodite, solitary, clocks, the armpit leaves, pedicel 14 mm. Calyx persistent, tube short 5 lacinii linear lanceolate, acute-tipped, pubescent. Corolla white, gamopetala, campanula, with 5 lobes, vilosTomentoasa in the inner-tube corolin. Blooms in July-September. Baca Fruit ovoid-oblong, green, becoming brown at maturation. Seeds spherical, brown.

Propagation - by seeds.

Curiosity - the name derives from the Greek Salpichroa 'salpe' - trumpet, and 'CHRO' - pale, 'origanifolia' to indicate the large number of plants like oregano leaves.

The plant can become invasive in areas where established.

Salpichroa organifolia is toxic.

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