13
Feb
2010
Syzygium aromaticum - clove
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida

Scientific Name– Syzygium aromaticum

Synonim– Eugenia caryophyllus, Eugenia aromatica

Common name(s)– cuisoare, clove tree, chiodo di garofano, Lavanga, gewùrznelke, cravo, clavo de olor, karanfil, dinh huong.

Distribution and Habitat– Native to the Moluccas, (islands of Eastern Indonesia, once known as the Spice Islands), cultivated in Indonesia, in Sri Lanka, India, Madagascar, Zanzibar. 

Description– evergreen tree, 6-20 m high. Leaves coriaceous, elliptic, obovate-elliptic, or lanceolate, 7-12 cm long, 2.5-4.5 cm wide, acuminate, base cuneate and acute, entire. Flowers red, in cymose terminal, 1-1.5 cm long, calyx 4-lobed, the lobes erect, acute; 4 petals; stamens numerous, filaments white, ovary inferior, 2-locular. In India flowering in February-May, in Zanzibar in July-September and October-January. Fruits oblong-ellipsoid, 2.5-3 cm long, 1.3-1.5 cm across, persistent calyx, pericarp thin. Seeds solitary, pinkish-purple, oblong. 

Growth rate

Tolerances– not survive temperatures below 10̊C, or above 37̊C.

Requirements– grow well in the rich, loamy soils and good drainage.

Management

Propagation– mature seeds have high vigour and better percentage of germination. Seeds require a pretratament of soaking in water for three days.

Pest and Diseases– Pseudomonas solancearum, Valsa eugeniae, Colletotrichum sp., Rhizoctonia sp., Trichoderma sp., Planococcus sp..

Garden Partners

Cultivars

Properties and Uses– clove bud oil is used in cosmetics and perfumery.

Eugenol, a constituent of clove, has been used for analgesic, local anesthetic, anti-inflamatory, and antibacterial effects.

Curiosity


Bibliography

James A. Duke -  The Green Pharmacy Herbal Handbook – Rodale Press,  2001

Phyllis Balch – Prescription for Herbal Healing – Avery Health Guides, 2003

Shiu-Ying Hu – Food Plants of China – Chinese University Press, 2006

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