23
May
2009
Westringia rigida
Trees and shrubs | Magnoliopsida

Scientific name - Westringia rigida

Westringia, was named in honor of JP Westring physicist.

Popular names - Australian Rosemary, stiff Westringia, East Rosemary.

Distribution and Habitat - originating in Tasmania, increases in Eucalypt forests on nisipo-clay and loamy soils.

Description - shrub 3 m high. Leaves disposed in each vertical 3 (4), the busiest peak, linear, 1.5 cm long, acuminata-mucronata, bright green top and white on the inside of the main rib prominent, margins Revol. Flowers tubular, the armpit leaves, to top Lujerul; 5 sepa persistent calyx, green, pubescent outside, tube 2.6-3.6 mm long, lobes triangular; Corola 7 mm long, white-purple, with purple dots on the lower labiumul; 2 stamens. Blooms in August-December.

Requirements - light soil, well drained, sunny exhibitions.

Natural partners and garden - Acacia aneura, Eucalyptus sp., Eremophila sp., Phebalium glandulosum.

 

Properties and Uses - a plant that attracts butterflies.

References

Margaret G. Corrick, Bruce A. Fuhrer - Wildflowers of Southern Western Australia - Rosenberg, 2009

Richard H. Groves - Australian Vegetation - Cambridge University Press, 1994

W. Arnold-Forster - Shrubs for the Counties - Alison Hodge, 2000

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